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Monster Mini Golf

Make a cardboard cutout of a monster (or other Halloween-appropriate shape) with the open mouth on the floor. You’ll also need ping-pong balls and a squeaky hammer (or rubber chicken, if you swing that way!).

Divide the class into teams. After each student answers a skill-testing question, let them use the squeaky hammer or rubber chicken to try to hit the ping pong ball into the monster’s mouth. Keep a tally of team points – one point per hit – and the team with the lowest score at the end of class is the winner.

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Bonk!

A silly game for reinforcing new vocabulary words through chanting. This works well with months, days of the week, ordinal numbers, the alphabet, and other ordered lists of words. If you teach math, this would be good for times tables!

Go over the words ahead of time, making sure everybody remembers the words in order. To play the game, all students stand up. Start by saying the first word yourself. Point to the first student and have them say the next word, and go around the room having each student say one word. If a student messes up (saying the wrong word or freezing up and saying nothing), shout “Bonk!” and bonk them on the head (or desk) with a squeaky hammer. They sit down, and the class continues until only one player is left standing, or until nobody makes any more mistakes. The last student standing is the winner!

Variation: The whole class chants together, while you bonk their names on the board. “Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday, BONK!” The eighth student’s name gets erased, and you continue chanting, erasing students’ names as you go. Add your own name to the list for fun, and change directions occasionally so the order is less predictable.

Variation 2: The class is divided into groups, table by table or row by row, and groups go back and forth saying the words in order. If one person in the group messes up, use the chant as a kind of “eeny, meany, miny, mo” to eliminate one of the students in the group. Continue until only one group remains.